Fruits to cook

We also market and produce specific varieties for cooking.

The dry pear martin

The Martin Sec pear is the pear par excellence (it is sold very hard and does not break at cooking), it seems that it was found in the gardens of Louis XIV. It is very small in size (the same size as a fig), it is the most beautiful effect on a dessert plate or as a side dish.
The production is at Etercy.

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The pear hurt or pear rissoles (variety really typical Savoyard)

Like her sister, she is very tough and does not break up when cooking. The injured pear is of a somewhat larger size and round shape. It has the distinction of becoming red when cooked for a long time. It really expresses all its mashed flavor by cooking it for hours. The purée reduction is caramelized and takes on a brilliant garnet red hue. It is most commonly used for the preparation of a typical Savoyard dessert rissole (or rézule). A slipper with caramelized pear puree.
The production is at Etercy.

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Quince

Raw quince is very astringent and rarely consumed as is. Ripe fruits are usually used to make jellies, jams, fruit pastes or cakes. Peeled quinces can also be roasted in the oven. Finally, the quince can be distilled and one thus obtains a liquor. In Eastern Europe quince is used, almost exclusively, as a vegetable, which is made a winter soup. The quince is the fruit of the quince. Piriform and voluminous, it is cottony on the surface and, when ripe, is yellow and very fragrant. For its presentation it is common to rub it to remove its down. However this down is natural and present on all quinces, simply those in supermarkets are the most frequently rubbed.
The orchards are in Alberville.

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